Posts Tagged With: pictish stones

Pictish Stones

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The Nigg Stone is an incomplete Class II Pictish cross-slab, perhaps dating to the end of the 8th century. The stone was originally located at the gateway to the grounds of the parish church of Nigg, Easter Ross. It is one of the finest surviving Pictish carved stones, and one of the most elaborate carved stones surviving from early medieval Europe. Replica on display at Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

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The Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a Class II Pictish stone discovered at Hilton of Cadboll, on the East coast of the Tarbat Peninsula in Easter Ross, Scotland. It is one of the most magnificent of all Pictish cross-slabs. The central panel of the stone shows a hunting scene. A woman wearing an ornate broach rides on horseback. She is accompanied by two other riders and two people on foot playing trumpet. Three dogs are bounding beside them. Replica on display at Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

Tree of Life - Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

Tree of Life – Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

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Pictish Key Patterns – Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

Pictish Key Patterns - Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

Pictish Key Patterns – Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland

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Rosemarkie Stone

2005.h72 Pictish Sculpture at Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie, Scotland – Theories about the meaning of the Pictish symbols have to take its unique evidence into account. Amidst the elaborate design (the slab is completely decorated) is a equal armed cross which takes the place of a typical Pictish hunting scene. It seems this particular Pictish monument was produced in a primarily ecclesiastical context and that the imagery of the hunt had no place in its function. The slender arms of the cross have stepped terminals and it’s set in a deep border. The background has finely meshed interlace catching the arms of the cross, but worked clear of the stud-like boss placed in each corner of the panel. There are two crescents still visible – a third one at the top is gone.  Beneath the top visible crescent is an infinity symbol which has a reverse Z-rod in the center.   The knobby flat discs within the infinity symbol contrasts with the all-over key-pattern of the bottom crescent.

These clever idiosyncrasies show that the Rosemarkie sculptor was a master of his art. 

 

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